Corned Beef & Cabbage – Hash

Did you pick up your corned beef for next weekend? I was sitting here wondering about the origin of the New England boiled dinner and why it is synonymous with St Patrick’s day! So instead of writing I have been reading. What I came up with is it was basically a poor man’s meal. Brisket is a cheaper cut of meat, corned comes from the large salt pieces to cure it. Americans didn’t invent it, it didn’t come here with the Irish immigrants, from what I read they are not eating this meal next Sunday in Ireland. the English were boiling meat long before we made this a staple here in New England on St Paddy’s day.

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this is an older picture of the same meal – been making this for YEARS!

None of this has changed my mind on whether or not I am going to make it next weekend; I am and yes I picked up my corned beef along with many other people. It was actually kind of like a frenzy at one of the stores I went to. Well there was a few people who were grabbing 3 or 4 of them a little more aggressively than I thought warranted.

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chopped up leftover corned beef hash

Confession time I actually made this last weekend as well. I was craving corned beef hash and yes I could have just bought a chunk of beef from the deli but it’s just not the same as having all the veggies and cabbage cooked in the salty water. In my reading this morning I am going to do something a little different for me. I am going to add beets to the pot. I don’t know of anyone that adds beets to their boiled dinner. But I am going to try it out. And I am looking forward to making red flannel hash which I have never had and honestly never really thought about why it was called that. So now I am interested it trying it next week.
img_3964.jpgSince this is such a simple meal and you can totally make it your own here is just the basic information.

Ingredients
2 Corned beef – flat cut or point cut / either is fine, I like point cut better – always 2 think leftovers
Potatoes – peeled and chunked – you don’t want them too small they will disintegrate
Carrots
Rutabaga
Cabbage
Bay leaf
Peppercorns

Above is what I grew up with and still make. But you can use any root vegetable you like. Parsnips, turnip, beets.

Directions
Place the corned beef in a large pot and cover with cold water. Add a bay leaf or two, some pepper corns. Bring to a boil and then lower the temp so it is simmering. Place the cover to your pot a little crooked so the steam can escape. Simmer for 3+ hours till the beef is nice and tender. Remove the beef to a plate or bowl and cover with tinfoil. Place the potatoes and veggies in the same water and bring to a boil, lower and simmer for about an hour till the rutabaga is soft. Add the cabbage during the last 15 minutes.

Veggies can be cooked separately if you would rather; but that’s a lot of dishes to clean. You can also stagger the veggies.  Rutabagas take the longest, then carrots and finally potatoes.
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Corned beef hash

leftovers
onion – diced  – I had some shallots so I diced one of those up too
olive oil
egg

dice up the veggies and beef. In a fry pan add a little oil and saute the onion. add the veggies and fry up till crispy edges, add the beef and cook till all warmed through. top with a poached or fried egg.
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Corned Beef Hash

It is another crazy weather day here in NH it is pouring and close to 50 degrees out there. What little snow we had should be pretty much gone before tomorrow when it is supposed to get cold again.

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My husband and son are working on a very large job with a tight deadline and headed off to work this Sunday morning; just for a couple of hours thankfully. One of his workers mentioned since they were getting out early enough; around 10ish that he was going to head home, make some brunch and watch a movie.  That totally worked into my plans; I was thinking of making a corned beef hash so I am glad the guys were going to coming home; I wouldn’t have made it for just us girls.

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I kind of recall having hash a couple of times when I was a kid but I guess I didn’t care for it? Only because I have never made it and have never ordered it out. Side note my husband is watching football and just asked if I was blogging about hash. He said that it was wicked good and mentioned he doesn’t recall ever having it before.  Hash also doesn’t sound like the most appealing item on any menu; at least in my opinion.

SO I just googled history of hash; first funny thing that caught my attention was that September 27 is national corned beef hash day; who knew 🙂 the next thing is it is derived from the French verb hacher (to chop). Yes everything is chopped and it helps that they are similar in size so they all cook up around the same time. It also said that it became popular during world war II as rationing the limited availability of fresh meat. It makes total sense and I am now on board with hash, I might even order a side of it next time we go out to breakfast.

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This morning my hash consisted of potatoes, onions and corned beef. It probably should have had beef stock but I had some open chicken stock in the fridge so I used that instead. A few weeks ago our WWW World Wide Wednesday meal was from Finland and my daughter made a sausage hash that we all loved which was why I was interested in trying corned beef hash.

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It really is simple so feel free to adjust to ingredients you have on hand and that your family will enjoy

Corned Beef Hash

1 medium onion chopped
2-3 medium potatoes chopped
Several slices of corned beef chopped
1 tbs butter
1-2 tbs olive oil
Kosher salt
Freshly cracked black pepper
½ cup beef broth or whatever you have on hand

My favorite type of egg is poached but you can do whatever kind you like or leave the egg out entirely.

In a hot fry pan melt the butter and olive oil together, add the potatoes; salt and pepper to taste. Add the onions and then the beef. Saute till the potatoes are cooked and a nice crust forms on the hash.