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Mocha Yule Log aka Buche de Noel

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After I made this I placed it in the fridge and didn’t tell anyone I made it. When each one went to get something out of the fridge; they each smiled and said “you made a yule log”

IMG_4891There are a few things I have wanted or at least thought about making and figured  they were beyond my reach. Not that I couldn’t make them more of I thought they were harder than I wanted to work for them; if that makes any sense.
IMG_4893IMG_4896Some recipes have a lot of ingredients listed which can look like it will take FOREVER to make the recipe; compare it to receiving a long email. You tend to zone out after the first paragraph or so and put it aside to “read” when you have time a little more time wink wink.
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While this recipe at first glance might look like it has a lot of ingredients it really is mostly hands off and didn’t take me very long at all, plus how forgiving is it since it is supposed to look like a log. I’ve tried to decorate cakes to perfection only to never get them quite right. This one turned out perfectly log like 🙂
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I know it tastes great since I got to eat the ends that I cut off to clean it up!

Mocha Yule Log aka Buche e Noel
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Ingredients
  1. 5 large eggs, separated
  2. 1/2 cup cake flour
  3. 1/4 cup baking cocoa
  4. 1/4 teaspoon salt
  5. 1 cup sugar, divided
  6. 1/2 teaspoon cream of tarter
  7. Filling
  8. 1 1/2 teaspoon instant coffee granules
  9. 1 cup heavy cream
  10. 1/2 cup confectioners sugar
  11. Frosting
  12. 1/3 cup butter, softened
  13. 2 cups confectioners sugar
  14. 1/3 cup baking cocoa
  15. 1 tablespoon brewed coffee, cooled
  16. 1 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  17. 2-3 tablespoon milk
Instructions
  1. place egg whites in a small bowl and yolks in a large mixing bowl. Let stand at room temperature about 30 minutes.
  2. Preheat oven to 350'F. Line bottom of a greased 15"x10"x1" pan with parchment; grease parchment. sift flour, cocoa and salt together twice. Beat the egg yolks until slightly thickened. Gradually add 1/2 cup of the sugar, beating on high speed until thick and lemon-colored about 3-4 minutes. Fold in the flour mixture.
  3. Add cream of tarter to the egg whites and with clean beaters, beat on medium until soft peaks form. Gradually add remaining sugar 1 tablespoon at a time. Beating on high after each addition until the sugar is dissolved. Continue beating until soft glossy peaks form. Fold a fourth on the whites into the batter then fold in remaining whites. transfer to prepared pan, spreading evenly.
  4. Bake until the top springs back when lightly touched, about 12-15 minutes. be careful to not overbake. Cool for 5 minutes. invert onto a clean tea towel dusted with cocoa. Gently peel off the parchment paper. Roll up the cake in the towel jelly-roll style, starting with the short side. Cool completely on a wire rack.
  5. Filling; in a bowl, dissolve coffee granules in the cream. beat until it begins to thicken. Add sugar; beat until stiff peaks form. Unroll cake and spread the filling over the cake to within 1/2 inch of all the edges. Roll up again, without the towel, trim the ends. Transfer to a platter, seam side down, refrigerate, covered until cold.
  6. Frosting: beat all the ingredients until smooth. spread over the cake. Using a fork, make lines in the frosting to resemble tree bark. Refrigerate until serving.
Adapted from Taste of Home test kitchen
Adapted from Taste of Home test kitchen
Cooking at Clark Towers https://cookingatclarktowers.com/
This blog won’t feel complete unless I share what I found about the history of the Buche de Noel. The tradition dates back to medieval times, one of many pagan rites competing with Christmas traditions. A log of wood—often from a fruit tree to ensure a successful harvest in the year to come—would be brought home and placed in the hearth, which at the time functioned as the epicenter of every family’s activity. Depending on the region and its various beliefs, salt, wine, or holy water—among other ingredients—were sprinkled atop the log before lighting it on fire. Sprinkling wine, for example, was yet another way to guarantee the following year’s grape harvest would be bountiful.

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Slicing it at an angle and placing the flat part against the roll makes it look like a branch

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using a fork you can make lines through the frosting to make it look rustic and more like a log

 

Once lit on Christmas Eve, the log had to burn for at least three days for good luck—ideally until the New Year. That was just the start: ash from the log provided protection against lightning strikes, and coals were used throughout the year in various medicinal potions. It is believed that it turned into a cake looking like a log around the 20th century.
IMG_4916IMG_4917IMG_4919IMG_4922There are so many variations out there, this recipe had me at mocha – I LOVE mocha!