Tag Archives: brunch

Bloody Mary Eggs

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The last couple of weeks my daughter has been perusing her cook books, which is saying something she has a lot of them. She seems to gravitate towards one of the ones I got her for Christmas a couple of years ago. Bringing it Home by Gail Simmons.  She has made several things from it and I have blogged about most of them.

I enjoy a good Bloody Mary on occasion; friends of mine opened a breakfast and lunch place just down the road and they have a few signature Bloody Mary cocktails which are a quite nice way to start off a weekend. I should tell them about this recipe and maybe they might check it out? The funny part is I knew what we were having but my husband didn’t. After a few bites we asked him if he thought it tasted like a Bloody Mary. He nodded, took another bite and said it tastes exactly like a Bloody Mary.

Gail came up with this recipe in a head to head challenge with Marcus Samuelson in 2014 and won. Marcus liked it so much he put it on his brunch menu at one of his restaurants. I think you should give it a try. Plus adding a poached egg to almost anything makes it that much better in my opinion.

The recipe makes extra sauce which lasts a few days in the fridge or do as we did and freeze it for another day!

Bloody Mary Eggs

A great morning after a late night out
Course Brunch

Ingredients
  

  • 2 28 ounce cans whole tomatoes, drained well San Marzano are the best
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil plus more for serving
  • 1 medium yellow onion finely chopped
  • 2 ribs celery thinly sliced, plus celery leaves for garnish
  • 1 clove garlic finely chopped
  • celery or kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup vodka plus 2 tablespoons
  • 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon hot sauce Tabasco, Cholula or Sriracha
  • black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons prepared horseradish plus 1 teaspoon
  • 1/2 cup pimento stuffed green olives
  • 2 teaspoon distilled white vinegar
  • 8 large eggs
  • 4 slices white bread toasted and drizzled with EVOO hearty or rustic works best

Instructions
 

  • Drain the tomatoes really well, using your clean hands break up the whole tomatoes into small pieces. Heat the oil in a medium sauce pan over medium heat. Add the onions, celery ribs and garlic. cook stirring occasionally, until softened about 6-7 minutes. Stir in 1/4 teaspoon salt and them add the vodka. Cook until the liquid is evaporated by half. about 7-8 minutes. Add the tomatoes, Worcestershire, hot sauce and a good size pinch of black pepper. and 3 tablespoons horseradish. Gently simmer, stirring occasionally, until the sauce is slightly thickened, 20-25 minutes. Stir in the olives and remaining horseradish, remove from the heat Adjust the seasoning and hot sauce to your liking.
  • Fill a large wide saucepan halfway with water and add the vinegar. Bring to a gentle simmer over medium heat. One at a time crack 4 eggs into a small bowl and carefully add each to simmering water. Poach for 3-4 minutes until the whites are set but the yolk is still runny,
    using a slotted spoon remove eggs from the water to a plate lined with paper towels and season with a little salt. If you have celery salt use it, if not kosher is great too.
    repeat with the 4 remaining eggs.
  • Divide the tomato sauce into four shallow bowl. Place a piece of toast in the center of each bowl, top with 2 poached eggs. Garnish with celery leaves and a drizzle of olive oil before serving.

Corned Beef Hash

It is another crazy weather day here in NH it is pouring and close to 50 degrees out there. What little snow we had should be pretty much gone before tomorrow when it is supposed to get cold again.

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My husband and son are working on a very large job with a tight deadline and headed off to work this Sunday morning; just for a couple of hours thankfully. One of his workers mentioned since they were getting out early enough; around 10ish that he was going to head home, make some brunch and watch a movie.  That totally worked into my plans; I was thinking of making a corned beef hash so I am glad the guys were going to coming home; I wouldn’t have made it for just us girls.

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I kind of recall having hash a couple of times when I was a kid but I guess I didn’t care for it? Only because I have never made it and have never ordered it out. Side note my husband is watching football and just asked if I was blogging about hash. He said that it was wicked good and mentioned he doesn’t recall ever having it before.  Hash also doesn’t sound like the most appealing item on any menu; at least in my opinion.

SO I just googled history of hash; first funny thing that caught my attention was that September 27 is national corned beef hash day; who knew 🙂 the next thing is it is derived from the French verb hacher (to chop). Yes everything is chopped and it helps that they are similar in size so they all cook up around the same time. It also said that it became popular during world war II as rationing the limited availability of fresh meat. It makes total sense and I am now on board with hash, I might even order a side of it next time we go out to breakfast.

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This morning my hash consisted of potatoes, onions and corned beef. It probably should have had beef stock but I had some open chicken stock in the fridge so I used that instead. A few weeks ago our WWW World Wide Wednesday meal was from Finland and my daughter made a sausage hash that we all loved which was why I was interested in trying corned beef hash.

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It really is simple so feel free to adjust to ingredients you have on hand and that your family will enjoy

Corned Beef Hash

1 medium onion chopped
2-3 medium potatoes chopped
Several slices of corned beef chopped
1 tbs butter
1-2 tbs olive oil
Kosher salt
Freshly cracked black pepper
½ cup beef broth or whatever you have on hand

My favorite type of egg is poached but you can do whatever kind you like or leave the egg out entirely.

In a hot fry pan melt the butter and olive oil together, add the potatoes; salt and pepper to taste. Add the onions and then the beef. Saute till the potatoes are cooked and a nice crust forms on the hash.